`Visionary tale of perception, superiority, evolution’:  Hina Khan starrer `Country of Blind’ receives 7.4 rating

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Srinagar: Forget `Dunki’ and `Animal’, ` The Country of Blind’, a movie by Kashmir actors and filmmakers, has received 7.4 CAT INDEX rating from a highly respected Cult Critic magazine.

“A visionary tale of perception, superiority, and evolution,” wrote Cult Critic in its review.

Starring Kashmir-born actor Hina Khan aka Akshara of `Yeh Rishta Kya Kehlata Hai’ fame and J&K-born actor Shoaib Nikash Shah of  `The Last Coffee’ fame, the movie was recently in the news for its Oscar submission.

 Apart from Hina and Shoib Anushka Sen, Inaamulhaq, Namita Lal, Pradhuman Singh, Mir Sarwar Jitendra Rai, and Kashmiri actors Ahmer Haider, Farhana, and Hussein Khan are in prominent roles.

Based on H.G. Wells short story `The Country of Blind’, it is one of the few movies that have been shot in English and Hindi languages.

It is a historic film set in the backdrop of the mighty Himalayas. Directed by award-winning J&K-born Bollywood filmmaker Rahat Kazmi, the movie was shot in Doodhpathri, Sonamarg, and Gulmarg. A small portion of the movie was also shot in Sanasar in Jammu

Last year, Hina Khan unveiled the first look at the Cannes Film Festival. It was received well by film critics at the festival.

“Celebrate an extraordinary cinematic voyage that ventures beyond the known boundaries of sight and perception in ‘The Country of Blind.’ Crafted by an ingenious director, this film guides audiences through an awe-inspiring narrative that navigates the uncharted territories of self-discovery and societal evolution,” wrote Cult Critic.

Cult Critic said what distinguishes ‘The Country of Blind’ is its profound examination of human perception and societal evolution. The film eloquently portrays the blind society’s advanced senses, allowing them to excel in ways that elude the mountaineer’s understanding. Through stunning visuals and immersive storytelling, audiences are invited to witness a thought-provoking experience that confronts conventional ideas of superiority.

“At the center of this story is a skilled mountain climber who, after a sudden fall from a dangerous peak, finds himself in a mysterious valley. Here, surrounded by stunning natural beauty, he discovers a community where everyone has been blind for many generations. Feeling confident because he can see while others cannot, the climber believes he’s better than the blind locals and thinks he can become their leader just because he has sight. He thinks having eyesight makes him more important than blind people and wants to be their boss. But as time passes, he starts to see things differently. He begins to understand that even though these folks can’t see, their other senses are incredibly strong, helping them understand the world in their unique way. He learns that their way of living and how they work together is very advanced, even though they’re blind,” added the magazine.

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