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Kulgam carnage: Biz community calls it ‘planned massacre of Kashmiris’

Srinagar, Oct 21: Kashmir Economic Alliance chairperson (KEA) Muhammad Yaseen Khan on Sunday strongly condemned the innocent killings in South Kashmir’s Kulgam district which has left six civilians dead and dozens seriously injured.

Blaming government forces for carrying a ‘planned massacre’ in state, KTMF president termed it sheer cowardice and an inhuman act.

Khan said: “Our youth are being slaughtered like animals as Government of India refuses to give up its policy of repression and acknowledge that people of Kashmir will not yield to submission”.


He said the entire Valley is in shock and state of mourning by the killing of six civilians in Kulgam.

Khan who also heads Kashmir Traders and Manufacturers Federation (KTMF) said that Kashmir issue can never be resolved through military might.

He said that Kashmir dispute has a historical background and context which can’t be ignored and dealing with it militarily and adopting a policy that includes killings will not work.

While extending full support to the Joint Hurriyat Leadership’s shutdown call for Monday, Khan said whole business community of the valley is with the people of Kulgam in this hour of grief.

Khan said this is an attempt to scare the people but let the government understand that we are a resilient nation. He appealed international community, Asia Watch and organisations for human rights to take cognizance of deteriorating gruesome situation and state sponsored terrorism in Jammu and Kashmir.

Six civilians were killed in a powerful explosion after a gunfight in Laroo village of south Kashmir’s Kulgam district in which three militants were killed on Sunday. One more civilian succumbed to his injuries at SKIMS Soura taking the death toll of civilians to six.

The news about the Kulgam killings spread like wild fire and public movement in Srinagar city and major towns of Kashmir valley virtually came to a grinding halt as passenger transport vehicles were rarely moving on very few roads in the Srinagar city.