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6 Health Benefits of Ginger For Your Body

The Kashmir Monitor

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Mostly used as a flavoring agent, ginger is one of the most recommended dietary ingredients around the world. Since ages, it has been used in medicines for treating problems like throat infection, cold, cough and headache. All the antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and therapeutic compounds like shogaol, paradol, zingerone and gingerol make it beneficial for your health. You can grate some ginger into your tea or in your meal to enhance the flavor of your food and gain access to enormous health benefits. From calming stomach ache to developing issues in the brain, ginger can do wonders to your health. Ginger root is available fresh, dried or in the form of capsule, tablets. Irrespective of the form, ginger is extremely beneficial for your body. While consuming ginger, you have to keep in mind that a small quantity of ginger should be combined with other nutrient-dense foods to get maximum benefits.
Here are 6 important health benefits of ginger you simply cannot miss.
1. Soothes Nausea
Ginger is known for its ability to treat nausea and vomiting. It helps decrease the symptoms of nausea with minimal side effects. Ginger has been used for years to treat morning sickness. Even when morning sickness is too extreme to bear, ginger can prove helpful.
2. Treats inflammation
Inflammation in the joints can result in arthritis. If you suffer from chronic pain, cold and illness frequently, there is a high chance that it is happening because your body is going through inflammation. Ginger is one of the most effective remedies for inflammation. Ginger roots boost endorphin levels in the body which is also known as a natural painkiller.
3. Reduces risk of heart diseases
One of the main reasons responsible for stroke and heart diseases is blood clotting. Controlling blood clotting is not a good option either as it can lead to both internal and external bleeding which can be fatal. Therefore, it is important for you to know how to balance. To help with clotting, you need to consume a decent amount of Vitamin K; ginger is a good source of vitamin K which prevents clots from forming in the wrong places.
4. Controls your blood sugar levels
To bring the high blood sugar (glucose) levels under control, insulin is released from the pancreas. In some cases, your body becomes resistant to insulin. Your body needs to produce more and more of it to be able to control the blood sugar. This can result in the development of type-2 diabetes. Ginger breaks down slowly in your body supports your metabolism.
5. Fights fungal infections
Out of all the health benefits of ginger, this one is the most important. It helps in killing disease-causing fungi because of the presence of powerful anti-fungal properties. According to studies, ginger is beneficial and works effectively against two types of yeasts which commonly cause fungal infections in the mouth. Some topical treatments use ginger as the main ingredient and these treatments are great for applying straight onto infected areas to fight the fungus.
6. May inhibit cancer growth
Ginger possesses anti-cancer properties due in the form of a powerful compound known as 6-gingerol. Studies have shown that ginger and its components may be effective in blocking cancer cell growth and development for ovarian, prostate and pancreatic cancer. However, a lot of research is needed to determine how the properties of ginger inhibit cancer and how it can be beneficial for humans.
Apart from these, ginger prevents stomach ulcers, eases menstrual pain, lowers cholesterol level, blocks bacterial infections, promotes proper digestion, etc.


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Health

Diabetes patients at higher risk of liver disease:study

The Kashmir Monitor

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While analysing 18 million people living with type-2 diabetes, a study led by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Glasgow found that diabetics are at a particular risk of developing deadly liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects up to a quarter of people in the West and is closely associated with obesity and type-2 diabetes. Its rise is reflective of the social problems of poor diets and sedentary lifestyles. Since general practitioners are often unaware of the condition, patients mostly go undiagnosed.

NAFLD is a benign condition for the majority but one-in-six people will go on to develop the aggressive form of the disease, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), leading to liver injury, scarring and eventually in some cases, cirrhosis, liver failure and even liver cancer.

 

Published in the journal of BMC Medicine, the team combined the healthcare records of 18 million European adults from the UK, Netherlands, Italy and Spain. They matched each NAFLD patient to 100 patients who did not have a recorded diagnosis, and looked to see who developed liver cirrhosis and liver cancer over time.

“We were surprised that the number of patients with recorded diagnoses of non-alcoholic fatty liver was much less than expected, meaning that many patients are actually undiagnosed in primary care. Even over the short time frame of the study, some patients progressed to more advanced, life threatening stages of disease, suggesting that they are being diagnosed very late,” said lead researcher Dr William Alazawi from Queen Mary University of London.

Naveed Sattar from the University of Glasgow said, “Doctors treating patients with diabetes already have a lot to check on – eyes, kidneys, heart risks – but these results remind us that we should not neglect the liver, nor forget to consider the possibility of NASH. They also remind us that perhaps more efforts are needed to help our patients with diabetes lose weight and cut alcohol.”

In India, prevalence of NAFLD is estimated to be around 9-32 per cent in the general Indian population, with a higher incidence rate among obese and diabetic patients. In fact, type-2 diabetes surges the risk of liver associated death by up to 22-fold in patients with NAFLD, as per National Center for Biotechnology.

Notably, a 2017-study, ‘Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its correlation with coronary artery disease (CAD)’, in India found that the prevalence of NAFLD was 41.2 per cent in the study group and was higher in females.

NAFLD in the younger age group was also significantly higher than that in the older age group. Elevated liver enzymes, elevated HbA1C, duration of diabetes, obesity, acanthosis nigricans and metabolic syndrome were all significantly associated with NAFLD.

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Health

How chronic stress promotes breast cancer development

The Kashmir Monitor

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Chinese researchers have revealed the mechanism of how chronic stress promotes breast cancer development, shedding light on future clinical treatment for cancer.

Cancer patients often suffer negative emotions such as anxiety, despair and fear, which are risk factors facilitating tumour growth as well as promoting cancer progression. However, the specific mechanisms of how chronic stress affects cancer development remains unknown yet.

Researchers from the Dalian Medical University in China found that chronic stress might increase epinephrine levels, which enhances lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) and promotes breast cancer stem-like cells, Xinhua reported.

 

Using a drug screen that targeted LDHA, they found that Vitamin C reversed the chronic stress-induced cancer stem-like phenotype.

The study demonstrates the critical importance of psychological factors in promoting stem-like properties in breast cancer cells and provides a promising therapeutic approach for breast cancer, according to Liu Qiang, lead researcher at the varsity.

“The LDHA-lowering agent Vitamin C can be a potential approach for combating stress-associated breast cancer,” Qiang said, in the paper published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

His team has been engaged in the dynamic regulation of cancer stem cells research as well as the mechanism of psychosocial behaviour affecting tumour development.

Qiang noted that patients with breast cancer, ovarian cancer and stomach cancer often have negative emotions, which in turn accelerates the development of their own tumours.

“It is necessary to monitor their chronic stress comprehensively by taking psychological assessments as well as conducting blood tests which include epinephrine levels,” Qiang said.

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Health

Moderate cholesterol intake not associated with risk of stroke

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Consuming up to one egg per day or moderately high intake of dietary cholesterol does not increase the risk of stroke, according to a study from the University of Eastern Finland. Furthermore, no association was found in carriers of the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism. The study was published in the ‘American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’.

Findings from earlier studies addressing the association of dietary cholesterol or egg intake with the risk of stroke have been contradictory. Some studies have found an association between high dietary cholesterol intake and an increased risk of stroke, while others have associated the consumption of eggs, which are high in cholesterol, with a reduced risk of stroke.

The dietary habits of 1,950 men aged between 42 and 60 years with no baseline diagnosis of cardiovascular disease were assessed at the onset the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, KIHD, in 1984-1989 at the University of Eastern Finland. APOE phenotype data were available for 1,015 of the men participating in the study. Of those, 32 per cent were known carriers of APOE4.

 

During a follow-up of 21 years, 217 men were diagnosed with a stroke. The study found that neither dietary cholesterol nor egg consumption was associated with the risk of stroke – not even in carriers of APOE4.

The findings suggested that moderate cholesterol intake or daily egg consumption are not associated with the risk of stroke, even in persons who are genetically predisposed to a greater effect of dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol levels.

In the highest control group, the study participants had an average daily dietary cholesterol intake of 520 mg and they consumed an average of one egg per day, which means that the findings cannot be generalised beyond these levels. One egg contains approximately 200 mg of cholesterol. In this study, about a fourth of the total dietary cholesterol consumed came from eggs.

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