Connect with us

International

Indonesia closes in on jet’s black box

Agencies

Published

on

IST


JAKARTA: Indonesian investigators said they were homing in on the black box from a crashed jetliner after locating its “pings” , two days after the jet crashed shortly after take-off with 189 people on board.

Retrieving the black box will be key to unlocking why the Boeing 737-MAX, one of the world’s newest and most advanced commercial passenger jets, nosedived into the Java sea so soon after leaving Jakarta.

Authorities said they believed they were closing in on the main wreckage and had picked up the box’s signals some 100-130 feet below the surface of the water off Indonesia’s north coast, where the plane crashed on Monday.

“We’ve detected the black box signal,” Muham­mad Syaugi, head of Indo­ne­sian search and rescue age­ncy, told reporters in Jakarta.

The black box contains flight data that shows the speed, altitude and direction of the plane, while the cockpit voice recorder keeps track of conversations and other sounds in the cockpit.


Advertisement
Loading...
Comments

International

Imran lashes out at trump, says US making Pak scapegoat of its failure

Agencies

Published

on

Islamabad: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan lashed out at US President Donald Trump following his remarks that Pakistan doesn’t “do a damn thing” for the United States despite billions of dollars in US aid for the South Asian nation.

The friction threatens to further worsen already fragile relations between Islamabad and Washington, on-off allies who have repeatedly clashed about the war in Afghanistan and Pakistan’s alleged support for Islamist militants.

Khan, who assumed power in August and is known for his fiery anti-American rhetoric, said in a series of tweets that “record needs to be put straight on Trump’s tirade against Pakistan” over the weekend.

Trump, during a Fox News TV interview aired on Sunday, defended cutting aid to Islamabad and also suggested Pakistani authorities knew Osama bin Laden’s location prior to his killing by U.S. troops in a raid inside Pakistan in 2011.

Pakistan denies supporting Afghan Taliban insurgents waging war against U.S.-backed troops in Afghanistan and Islamabad has also always rejected claims officials aided former al Qaeda leader bin Laden.

“Instead of making Pakistan a scapegoat for their failures, the US should do a serious assessment of why, despite 140,000 NATO troops plus 250,000 Afghan troops & reportedly $1 trillion spent on war in Afghanistan, the Taliban today are stronger than before,” Khan tweeted.

Trump, in a pre-recorded interview, said bin Laden had been living in “a nice mansion” in Pakistan next to a military academy and “everybody in Pakistan knew he was there”.

“And we give Pakistan $1.3 billion a year. …(bin Laden) lived in Pakistan, we’re supporting Pakistan, we’re giving them $1.3 billion a year – which we don’t give them anymore, by the way. I ended it because they don’t do anything for us, they don’t do a damn thing for us.”

Khan said Pakistan had borne the brunt of the United States’ war on terror, which focused on militants that straddle the Afghanistan-Pakistan tribal belt.

“No Pakistani was involved in 9/11 but Pak decided to participate in US War on Terror,” Khan said. “Pakistan suffered 75,000 casualties in this war & over $123 bn was lost to economy. US “aid” was a minuscule $20 bn.”

Khan also pointed out that Pakistan continued to provide its roads and air space for the re-supply for more than 10,000 US troops currently based in Afghanistan.

“Can MTrump name another ally that gave such sacrifices?”

Continue Reading

International

‘Fools never told us he was there’: Trump hits out at Pakistan over Bin Laden

Agencies

Published

on

Washington: Donald Trump repeated that Al Qaeda chief Osama Bin Laden, killed by US Navy Seals in May 2011, should have been captured much earlier, casting blame on his predecessors and Pakistan.

“Of course we should have captured Osama Bin Laden long before we did,” the US President tweeted, echoing remarks he gave to Fox News Sunday that drew the ire of Pakistan, where Bin Laden had been hiding.

“I pointed him out in my book just BEFORE the attack on the World Trade Centre,” he continued.

“President Clinton famously missed his shot. We paid Pakistan Billions of Dollars & they never told us he was living there. Fools!”

Ten years after the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, Bin Laden was found to be hiding in the Pakistani city of Abbottabad, where he was killed in a raid by US Navy Seals.

The assault sent relations between the wayward allies to a new low.

In his interview on Sunday the Republican leader had said he cancelled assistance worth hundreds of millions of dollars to Pakistan earlier this year because “they don’t do anything for us, they don’t do a damn thing for us.”

Trump had also told Fox News that Bin Laden had lived “beautifully in Pakistan and what I guess in what they considered a nice mansion, I don’t know, I’ve seen nicer.”

Pakistan leader Imran Khan hit back Monday at Donald Trump’s claim, calling on the president to name an ally which has sacrificed more against militancy.

“Pakistan suffered 75,000 casualties in this war & over USD 123 bn was lost to economy. US “aid” was a miniscule USD 20 bn,” Khan tweeted.

Continue Reading

International

Saudi king backs son, praises judiciary amid furore over Khashoggi murder

Agencies

Published

on

Riyadh: Saudi King Salman stood by the crown prince and heaped praise on the judiciary , in his first public remarks since critic Jamal Khashoggi’s murder tipped the country into one of its worst crises.

The public prosecutor last week exonerated Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the king’s son, of involvement in the murder in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2, but the CIA reportedly concluded he had ordered the assassination.

The prosecutor called for the death penalty against five men, announced indictments against 11 people, and said a total of 21 individuals were in custody in connection with the killing.

“The kingdom was founded on Islamic principles of justice and equality, and we are proud of the efforts of the judiciary and the public prosecution,” the 82-year-old monarch said in his annual address to the Shura Council, a top advisory body.

“We ensure that this country will never deviate from implementing God’s law without discrimination,” he added, without directly addressing the murder of The Washington Post columnist in his speech.

In Saudi Arabia’s absolute monarchy, only the king has the authority to oust the powerful crown prince –- who faces intense global criticism over the murder –- but he has repeatedly indicated that he has no intention to do so.

In his speech, the king praised his son’s economic reform program aimed at creating jobs for a swelling youth population and preparing the kingdom for a post-crude era.

Saudi-owned Al-Arabiya television reported the prince will attend the upcoming Group of 20 summit in Argentina, his first overseas trip since the murder.

In a show of defiance, the prince will come face-to-face with international leaders from Turkey, the United States and other European nations at the two-day summit that begins November 30.

“The crown prince is sending a very clear message to the international community that nothing they say or do over the Khashoggi affair will interfere with Saudi decision making,” said Kristian Ulrichsen, a fellow at Rice University’s Baker Institute in the United States.

“Effectively, he is daring his international critics to put their rhetoric into action and betting that they won’t.”

Continue Reading