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Editorial

India-Russia defence deal

The Kashmir Monitor

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Last week, India and Russia signed a 5.2 billion dollar air defence deal for S-400 system which is expected to be delivered by the year 2020. Russian President Vladimir Putin, who was on a two-day visit to India, met Prime Minister Narendra Modi on October 5, and was personally welcomed by Foreign Minister Sushma Swaraj at the airport. The S-400 Triumf is an advanced surface-to-air missile system, developed by Russia’s state-owned company Almaz-Antey, and can shoot down hostile aircraft and ballistic missiles. It has an estimated range of 250 kilometres and a possible upgrade is speculated to extend it to 400 kilometres. One cannot deny the importance of a strong defence system of the nation-states, more particularly in the prevailing global uncertainty and insecurity. But the basic question is does the purchase of heavy and sophisticated arms help meet the challenges facing the nation states. A strong defence system can protect the country from outside transgression. How can these help in terminating internal issues. The instance of the erstwhile USSR is before the world. The Soviet Union was equipped with over 10,000 nuclear arsenals before its death in 1989. It was no less powerful than America. But its sudden demise in 1991 showed that no amount of arms can protect a country from the internal turmoil caused by falling living standards, abject poverty, inflation, and the lack of basic amenities. It goes without saying that India are facing more internal challenges than the external ones. These challenges are in the shape of poverty, lack of basic amenities, social imbalance among various communities, communal onslaught, and the last but not the least, free-will political objectives. Ignoring the fundamental problems and spending on arms is bound to multifold the problems instead of solving one. Indian houses the poorest of poor people more than any other country in the world. In 2013, a United Nations survey revealed that African Sub Saharan countries were the poorest in the world. The same report, however, said that India house 40crore people poorer than Sub Saharan African people. In India 1.77 million people are still homeless. Around 732 million people don’t have access to toilets. Only 48.4 percent of households in India have improved sanitation facilities and the prevalence of diarrhoea in the country stands at 9.2 percent. Around 53.10 percent of non-pregnant women are anaemic while 50.30 percent of pregnant women suffer from the deficiency. Around 60,700 children die of diarrheal diseases every year. Analysts say that only $30 billion is needed to build 111.1 million toilets that can benefit a large number of people and help prevent many diseases. Another 100 billion dollar invested in social and health sectors would take the country to the new heights social standard. It needs to be understood that America is not a world power merely for possessing nuclear arms and military might. Its strength lies in providing quality healthcare, free education, decent housing, and other basic amenities to its citizens. The history of France and the UK isn’t different either. British fleets and French jets weren’t the only elements that turned Britain and France, respectively, into great powers. The real strength of these countries also lies in empowering their people by offering various provisions. The major fallout of India-Russia arms deal is that Pakistan, which is no different from India with regard to internal problems, will follow the suit. Islamabad is has already lagged behind New Delhi in terms of conventional strength. Despite being a smaller economy, Pakistan is already spending a huge amount on its defence. Forcing it make more spending on in unwanted sector could have catastrophic consequences not only for Pakistan also for the entire south Asian region. Government of India need to look inwards instead of outward and make policies and take decisions in tune with the needs of the common people.


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Editorial

H1N1 Scare

The Kashmir Monitor

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Swine flu also known as H1N1 has once again taken lives in Kashmir with over 22 deaths recorded so far at Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS) Soura.Swine flu is now considered a seasonal flu which mostly survives in cold humid conditions. Since September last year, over 1400 samples had been tested and more than 270 samples were found positive. Besides that at least 117 patients had been admitted in the hospital since September. In Kashmir, the situation turned worst during last season when 30 swine flu deaths were reported at SKIMS between October 2017 and February 2018. Doctors in the hospital have warned that H1N1 is a contagious disease and can transmit from one person to another.

They have asked for taking precautionary measures to escape the disease. This is matter of serious concern. The even more alarming is the shortage of medicines. Report says that the valley hospitals are without proper medicine. Barring SKIMS and SMHS hospital, there is no flu vaccine available in any hospital in the valley. This leaves SKIMS and SMHS as the only testing and treatment centre. Experts say that the swine flu outbreak can be contained but only if medicines reach the affected on time. When the hospitals are not equipped with the testing and treatment drugs, how the disease could be contained. There is every reason for the people to feel panicky and authorities need to take the problem seriously and equip hospital with adequate medicine before the panic take over the valley. The panic has gripped even the medical fraternity as well as the lack of relevant vaccines has put the lives of doctors at risk.

Doctors at SKIMS, who are dealing with patients at the Emergency and the OPD of the hospital, too are vulnerable to the disease and could catch infection in the absence of immunization and protective gear. Doctors and other hospital staff are not provided with personal protection equipments while dealing with H1N1 patients thus putting them also at risk of contracting the virus. There are no H1N1 vaccines which are to be given to high-risk persons with diabetes, elderly, children below 5 years, pregnant women, chronic diseases, immuno compromised and healthcare workers as the virus can be fatal in them. The designated laboratory for testing at SKIMS does not have the desired Biosafety-3 level for handling and processing H1N1 samples which is dangerous to staff and community. No sensitization and awareness programmes are conducted in hospitals with the result majority of H1N1 patients are overlooked. What is even more criminal is the silence by the concerned authorities.

 

They have maintained complete silence over the deadly contours of the disease and the non-availability of the medicines.It is no less than criminal that despite these disturbing realities, some sections in the government would give false hope to people and come out with advisories of ‘no-panic’. The state administration should, in first place, take note of health hazards in the wake of fast spreading swine flu and activate the administration to take necessary measures, provide relevant vaccines and other medicine and expertise for the disease.

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Editorial

Sanity should prevail

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Kashmiris in Jammu or elsewhere are under fire. The fallout of the Lethpora suicide bombing, in which 49 paramilitary troopers were killed, has made the people of the valley the main target of the right-wing violence. Incidents of arson and direct attacks on Kashmiris in the winter capital have turned the situation tense. The situation in other states, especially ones in northern India, where Kashmiris are studying or operating their businesses isn’t any better. Valleyites putting up in many states have been warned to vacate their rented accommodations by mobs, who have given ultimatums to the landlords asking them to throw out any Kashmiri tenant they have. Videos of the attacks, warnings and vandalisation are being shared online.  Since Friday, Jammu is officially under curfew. However, even after that mobs on Saturday attacked a number of quarters belonging to Kashmiris, especially ones at Janipur area. A number of Kashmiris in Janipur said they were attacked by the frenzied mobs despite the presence of police. The mobs entered inside the premises and attacked quarters of Kashmiris while police, according to the callers, remained a mute spectator. Already on Friday, there was widespread violence in which mobs torched 30 vehicles and damaged over 50 of them during a strike called by the Jammu Chamber of Commerce and Industries and Bar Association against the Thursday’s attack.

The anger that has exploded against Kashmiris has exposed the claims politicians have been time and again taking refuge in. One: The people of the valley need to be a part of ‘mainstream’ (whatever that means) and two: Kashmiris should chase their dreams in mainland India. How can they? The way the situation has unfolded after the deadly attack on Thursday reveals the vulnerability of the entire premise.

For now, the need of the hour is ensuring sanity and calmness prevails. The people in Jammu, at the majority of them, are not anti-Kashmir. They are simple, middle-class people who want to live and let live. However, at times they may be drawn out and flocked by miscreants looking to cash in on this opportunity of fomenting trouble for their own interests. Loss of lives, whosoevers’ and wherever they are lost is condemnable. Instead of falling into the trap of pitting one against another, the need to is avoid the situation getting out of control and avoiding fallouts that can snowball into major rioting or something even worse.

 
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Editorial

Plight of Indian Muslims

The Kashmir Monitor

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Islam is the second largest religion in India, with 14.2% of the country’s population or roughly 172 million people identifying as adherents of Islam. Over the centuries, Muslims have played a notable role in economics, politics and culture of India, however 70 years after independence the overall condition of Indian Muslims is pathetic.

Poverty illiteracy and ghettoization has marred Muslims for decades now. Ghettoisation among Indian Muslims began in the mid-1970s when first communal riots occurred. It got heightened after the 1989 Bhagalpur violence in Bihar and became a trend after the demolition of the Babri Masjid in 1992. Soon several major cities developed ghettos, or segregated areas, where the Muslim population moved in. This trend however, did not help for the anticipated security the anonymity of ghetto was thought to have provided.

During the 2002 Gujarat riots, several such ghettos became easy targets for the rioting mobs, as they enabled the profiling of residential colonies. This kind of ghettoisation can be seen in Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata and many cities of Gujarat where a clear socio-cultural demarcation exists between Hindu-dominated and Muslim-dominated neighbourhoods.

 

In places like Gujarat, riots and alienation of Muslims have led to large scale ghettoisation of the community. For example, the Juhapura area of Ahmadabad has swelled from 250,000 to 650,000 residents since 2002 riots. Muslims in Gujarat have no option but to head to a ghetto, irrespective of their economic and professional status.

Increase in ghetto living has also shown a strengthening of stereotyping due to lack of cross-cultural interaction, and reduction in economic and educational opportunities at large. Secularism in India is being seen by some as a favour to the Muslims, and not an imperative for democracy

The Sachar Committee Report explored and commented upon a truly wide range of random issues and concerns, often with a view to forcefully place the Muslim viewpoint on those issues in the public sphere. This included making observations on the high birth rate in the Muslim community in comparison to Hindus: the committee estimated that the Muslim proportion will stabilize at between 17% and 21% of the Indian population by 2100.As per the 2011 census, the population of Muslims is nearly 15% and rose by over 2% over a period of only ten years.

The Sachar Committee highlighted and presented its suggestions on how to remove impediments those preventing Indian Muslims from fully participating in the economic, political, and social mainstream of Indian life. The report was the first of its kind to reveal the “backwardness” (a term used in Indian academic and legal discourse for historically dispossessed or economically vulnerable communities, not meant to be pejorative) of Indian Muslims. An issue highlighted was that while Muslims constitute 14% of the Indian population, they only comprise 2.5% of the Indian bureaucracy. The Sachar Committee concluded that the conditions facing Indian Muslims was below that of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.

Report brought the issue of Muslim Indian inequality to national attention, sparking a discussion that is still ongoing. The Committee recommended setting up an Equal Opportunity Commission to provide a legal mechanism to address discrimination complaints, including in matters such as housing. In response to the Committee’s findings, Finance Minister P. Chidambaram proposed an increase to the National Minorities Development and Finance Corporation’s (NMDFC) budget, citing new duties and expanded outreach that the institution would take on to implement the Committee’s recommendations.

However, no such recommendations have been implemented and Muslims continue to suffer in India even seven decades after independence.

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