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Adobe Scan uses advanced AI to convert physical business cards into digital cards

Monitor News Bureau

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Adobe announced new enhancements to Adobe Document Cloud with advancements in its products including “Adobe Sign”, “Adobe Scan” and new portable document format (PDF) integration with Microsoft Office 365.
With the new Adobe PDF Services integration in Microsoft Office 365, users would now be able to create, manipulate and view high-quality, secure PDFs right from the ribbon in online versions of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneDrive and SharePoint.
“Adobe and Microsoft are integrating best-in-class cloud services to meet the needs of today’s agile and rapidly evolving workforce,” Ashley Still, Vice President and General Manager, Digital Media, Adobe, said in a statement.
Adobe became Microsoft’s preferred e-signature solution for Office 365 in September 2017, and now the company would deliver deeper integration with Microsoft Dynamics 365.
“Building on the initial success of our partnership focused on Adobe Sign, we’re thrilled that Microsoft Office 365 customers now have access to the expansive PDF services from Adobe,” said Ron Markezich, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Office 365 at Microsoft Corp.
The company also claimed that “Adobe Sign” would be part of the “Federal Risk and Authorisation Management Program (FedRAMP)”, that complies with the strictest government security standards.
The complex AI?algorithm behind new Adobe Scan
Additionally, “Adobe Scan” which is a free app to turn phones and tablets into a scanning and text recognition tool, introduced new functionality that turns physical business cards into digital contacts on phones, powered by Adobe Sensei, Adobe’s Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning platform. While there are a number of such third-party applications, Google’s Lens and Microsoft’s Office Lens also provide similar features.
Adobe further explains how its technology makes sure the AI?detects the physical card as card and not any other kind of document.
“By using Adobe’s advanced image processing techniques, powered by Adobe Sensei, Adobe Scan can make the digital text on a business card extractable, reusable, and searchable in a secure, reliable PDF. It even automatically removes unwanted objects from your business card scan, like that thumb or finger you’re using to hold the card. This is actually a pretty big challenge because business cards are not made in the same way. They all have different colors, different fonts, and are even scanned with different backgrounds,”?says the company on its website.
The company elaborates that it uses “heuristic” approach to make the AI understand different fields of a business cards like name, email ID?and addresses.
“By incorporating heuristic principles into Adobe Scan, the app can recognize with high confidence that “[email protected]” is an email address. Our team continues to work on new Adobe Sensei models in Adobe Scan that will quickly recognize more fields like company names and addresses with even higher accuracy,” it added.
This is not the first time Adobe is leveraging cutting edge technologies to improve its mass products like Adobe Scan. The application, which has more than 10 million downloads, recently added Adobe Sensei (an AI and machine-learning platform) and built-in optical character recognition to provide various AI-based features. One of the highlights of the recent update was the ability to detect documents in the phone gallery.


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Baby’s First Smart Diaper: Pampers Takes ‘Wearables’ to a Whole New Level

The Kashmir Monitor

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Pampers is the latest company to jump into trendy, wearable devices with a new “connected care system” called Lumi that tracks babies’ activity through a sensor that attaches to diapers.

The sensor sends an alert to an app notification when a diaper is wet. It also sends information on the baby’s sleep and wake times and allows parents to manually track additional info, like dirty diapers and feeding times. A video monitor is included with the system and is integrated into the app. Pampers didn’t say how much the system, which is launching in the US this fall, will cost.

The announcement Thursday from Pampers, which is part of Procter & Gamble, is a sign of the growth in the “baby tech” industry. The Internet of things, or IoT, has invaded homes, promising to make routines and tasks more efficient. Companies have launched connected bassinets, smart night lights and pacifiers, bottles that track feedings and even apps to replicate the sound of a parent saying, “Shush.” Research and Market report predicts the interactive baby monitor market alone will reach more than $2.5 billion by 2024.

 

But with the increase in “smart” options for babies and younger children, too, parents must make decisions about how much tech to use as they seek to raise them in an increasingly connected world.

“Even an infant or a toddler deserves a little privacy,” said Julie Lythcott-Haims, author of bestselling book “How to Raise an Adult.”

From smart diapers to social media, today’s parents are grappling with an ever-expanding crop of privacy concerns triggered by widespread connectivity of devices.

Posting photos, tracking their development in an app or even searching for information on their health conditions can help big tech develop digital profiles that could follow those children for the rest of their lives.

In many cases, it’s still unclear how data for children’s connected devices are used and how secure it is. Take baby monitors and security cameras: There are dozens of examples of baby or child monitors being hacked or otherwise compromised, including an incident reported by The Washington Post earlier this year in which a Nest Cam installed in a child’s room began playing pornography.

Lythcott-Haims said that parents should proceed carefully when evaluating data-collecting mechanisms for use on their children, even in the earliest stages of life. Tracking a baby too closely could also quickly morph into helicopter parenting.

“When does tracking every move become inappropriate surveillance?” Lythcott-Haims asked. “If we can track their diapers, we can track their Pull-Ups, then we can put trackers on their clothing. Pretty soon we don’t have to worry because we’ll know everything from before birth to end of their lives.”

The Lumi system encrypts all data and uses “the same standard of security as the financial services industry,” said Pampers spokeswoman Mandy Treeby. The system does not currently include two-factor authentication, something security experts consider key to avoiding unauthorised access to systems.

The goal of the system is to alleviate stress for new parents, and feedback from those testing the system has so far been positive, Treeby added.

Lumi isn’t the first jaunt into high-tech diapers. In 2016, Google’s parent company Alphabet filed a patent for “a diaper sensor for detecting and differentiating feces and urine.” Last year, Huggies partnered with Korean company Monit to launch a smart diaper sensor in Korea and Japan.

The risk with so many ordinary objects becoming “smart” is that it makes them dependent on software updates and malfunctions – or a product losing its connectivity if a company goes out of business or discontinues the line. Nike’s $350 self-lacing shoes for instance stopped lacing earlier this year because of a software update.

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FaceApp is fun but dubious terms of service raises serious privacy questions

The Kashmir Monitor

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AI photo editing app, FaceApp resurrected in the past week. Everyone’s social media feed is now filled with people posting photos of how they would look when they turn old. While FaceApp is all the rage right now you may be giving the company access to a lot more than you think.

FaceApp had a surge in downloads starting slowly on July 12 and getting a big push from July 13 according to Sensor Tower. In India, FaceApp was down for a few hours late last night but the app is now accessible. To use FaceApp, one needs to give permission access to their photos. While this seems understandable, FaceApp can do much more with your photos then just edit them.

First spotted by Forbes, FaceApp has some dubious terms of service which is detailed on the company’s website. The most striking thing about FaceApp’s terms of service is that the company has rights to use “user content” for commercial purposes.

 

“You grant FaceApp a perpetual, irrevocable, nonexclusive, royalty-free, worldwide, fully-paid, transferable sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, publicly perform and display your User Content and any name, username or likeness provided in connection with your User Content in all media formats and channels now known or later developed, without compensation to you,” reads FaceApp’s terms.

FaceApp clearly states that it can use your photos and information shared on the app for commercial purposes without any royalties. While it’s totally up to the user to do as they like with their FaceApp photos, it also raises security questions, especially since FaceApp is storing user data.

Ever since the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there has been continuous scrutiny over sharing user data with services. Facebook’s 10 year challenge which became viral globally was also suspected to be a major data collecting scheme. Nothing has been proved as yet, but it’s definite that users are still not aware about how companies have access to data. FaceApp has now been downloaded by over 100 million users on Android, and it also became the top-ranked app on iOS.

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Rape case: Aditya Pancholi gets interim protection till Aug 3

The Kashmir Monitor

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A sessions court extended till August 3 the interim protection from arrest granted to actor Aditya Pancholi in a case of rape filed against him by a Bollywood actress.

Pancholi had approached the court seeking anticipatory bail after the suburban Versova police lodged an FIR against him on June 28.

The actor was then granted interim protection from arrest till July 19.

 

“The court on Friday adjourned the hearing on the plea till August 3. The interim protection granted to Pancholi from arrest shall continue till then,” Pancholi’s advocate Prashant Patil said.

The 54-year-old actor has been charged under sections 376 (rape), 328 (causing hurt by means of poison), 384 (extortion), 341 (wrongful restraint), 342 (wrongful confinement), 323 (voluntarily causing hurt) and 506 (criminal intimidation) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC).

The actress alleged that between 2004-2006, Pancholi kept her at different locations and forcibly tried to establish a relationship with her by spiking her drinks.

Pancholi claimed that he has been falsely implicated in the case.

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