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Abs Workout for Beginners

The Kashmir Monitor

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The abdominal muscles, core, or abs indicate fitness, for most people. In general, abdominal visibility is considered aesthetic and sometimes viewed by people as a sign of being fit, a reason why many people train the abs during workout sessions. The following are some abs exercises beginners may perform.

Butterfly Crunch

Beginners can do the butterfly crunch to workout the abs. According to Fitness Magazine, the person lies on his back, with the soles of the feet as close to the body as possible and the knees bent out to the sides. Next, he places his hands behind his head and the elbows in line with his ears. After that, he keeps his back flat on the floor, contracts his abdominal muscles, exhales, and curls the chest up some inches of the ground toward the legs. Then, the person goes back to the initial position. The exercise is done for the planned number of repetitions and sets.

 

Standing Bicycle Crunches

The standing bicycle crunch is one of the abdominal exercises that can be done by beginners in the fitness realm. According to Daily Burn, the person stands with his feet hip-width apart, with his hands placed behind his head. Next, he lifts his right leg and right knee and lowers his left elbow towards each other. This is done with the core tight, back straight, and shoulders relaxed. Once done, the person goes back to the starting position and does the same movements on the opposite side. As per the publication, the person can lift his knee to his chest while his upper body is kept still, if rotating the upper body downwards is too hard.

Tummy Vacuums

Another abs exercise for beginners is the tummy vacuums, or stomach vacuums. As per Breaking Muscle, it helps recondition the transverse abdominals, which brace the spine during movement. According to the publication, the muscle is comparable to an internal weight belt that needs to be engaged when a person wants to move or lift something.

As per Build Muscle 101, a person starts stomach vacuums with his knees and hands on the floor or a standing position with the hands on a table. According to the publication, the person’s back should be curved to properly execute the vacuum. Next, he blows out the air from his lungs, squeezing his diaphragm. Then, the person tucks his stomach in and expands his lungs as if he were breathing without letting any air in. He uses his diaphragm to suck in his belly tightly and holds it for about 10 seconds. After that, he releases and breathes for a few times and repeats the exercises for the planned number of repetitions and sets.

Cable Crunch

Beginners can train their abdominals with cable crunch. According to Body Building, the person kneels below a high pulley that has a rope attachment. Next, he grasps the cable rope attachment and then lowers the rope until his hands are placed next to his face. After that, he flexes his hips mildly, allowing the weight to hyperextend the lower back. Then, with his hips stationary, he flexes his waist as his contracts the abdominal muscles, allowing the elbows to go towards the mid-thigh area. The person breathes out as he performs the movement and holds the contraction briefly. Once done, he breathes in as he gradually returns to the initial position. A good practice is to maintain the tension on the core throughout the movement.

While some view having abs as easy, it may not be that easy in reality. Total abdominal development requires hardwork, patience, discipline, proper nutrition, and adequate rest.


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Health

Higher salt intake can cause gastrointestinal bloating, says study

The Kashmir Monitor

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People report more gastrointestinal bloating when they eat a diet high in salt, a study has found.

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the US re-analysed data from a large clinical trial conducted two decades ago, and found that high sodium intake increased bloating among trial participants.

“Bloating is one of the leading gastrointestinal complaints in the US and can be exacerbated in some people by a high-fiber diet. Our results suggest that they might be able to reduce that bloating, without compromising on healthy fiber, by lowering their sodium intake,” said Noel Mueller, senior author of the study.

 

Bloating is estimated to affect up to a third of US adults overall, and more than 90 per cent of those with irritable bowel syndrome, according to the study.

Bloating features a buildup of excess gas in the gut. The production of gas can be attributed to gas-producing gut bacteria breaking down fiber. There is also some evidence that sodium can stimulate bloating.

The study, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, is the first to examine sodium as a cause of bloating in the context of low- and high-fiber diets.

The study analysed data from the DASH-Sodium trial, conducted at four clinical centres during 1998-99. It tested the DASH diet, a high-fiber diet which is relatively low in fat and high in fruits, nuts, and vegetables, against a low-fiber control diet.

Each of the two diets was tested at three levels of sodium, and the 412 participants all had high blood pressure at the trial start.

The trial was set up chiefly to determine the effect of dietary sodium and other factors on blood pressure, but included data on participants’ reports of bloating — data that Mueller and his colleagues analysed for the new study.

The team found that prior to the trial, 36.7 per cent of the participants reported bloating, which is more or less in line with national surveys of bloating prevalence.

They found too that the high-fiber DASH diet increased the risk of bloating by about 41 percent, compared to the low-fiber control diet — and men were more susceptible to this effect, compared to women.

But the scientists also determined that sodium was a factor in bloating. When they combined data from the DASH and control diets, and compared the highest level of sodium intake to the lowest, they found that the high-sodium versions of those diets collectively increased the risk of bloating by about 27 per cent compared to the low-sodium versions.

The key implication is that reducing sodium can be an effective way to reduce bloating — and in particular may be able to help people maintain a healthy, high-fiber diet.

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Health

Second-hand smoking dangerous:study

The Kashmir Monitor

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A recent study has discovered a link between second-hand smoking and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

The study, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, found out that exposure to second-hand smoking increases the risk of various diseases and the researchers investigated the link between exposure to second-hand smoking and CKD.

The study included 131,196 never-smokers who participated in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study from 2001 to 2014. Participants were classified into 3 groups based on the frequency of second-hand smoke exposure as assessed with survey questionnaires: no-exposure, less than 3 days per week of exposure, and 3 or more days per week of exposure.

 

Participants with less than three days per week and those with three or more days per week of exposure had 1.48-times and 1.44-times higher odds of having CKD when compared with participants with no second-hand cigarette exposure

“Second-hand smoke exposure at home or in the workplace is still prevalent despite legislative actions prohibiting public smoking.

This exposure was found to be clearly related with CKD, even with less-frequent amounts of second-hand smoke exposure,” said Jung Tak Park, the lead researcher.

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Health

Vitamin C may lower BP, sugar levels in diabetics

The Kashmir Monitor

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Taking vitamin C supplements can help diabetics by lowering elevated blood sugar levels throughout the day, a study has found.

The research, published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, also found that vitamin C lowered blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes, suggesting benefits for heart health too. According to Glenn Wadley from Deakin University in Australia, the results may help millions currently living with the health condition.

”We found that participants had a significant 36 per cent drop in the blood sugar spike after meals. This also meant that they spent almost three hours less per day living in a state of hyperglycaemia,” Wadley said. “This is extremely positive news as hyperglycaemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in people living with type 2 diabetes,” he said.

 

“We also found that the proportion of people with hypertension halved after taking the vitamin C capsules, with both their systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels dropping significantly,” Wadley added. The dose of vitamin C used in the study was about 10 times the normal dietary intake and readily available from most health food stores, researchers said.

“Vitamin C’s antioxidant properties can help counteract the high levels of free radicals found in people with diabetes, and it’s encouraging to see this benefits a number of the disease’s common comorbidities, such as high blood pressure,” he said. “While physical activity, good nutrition and current diabetes medications are standard care and very important for managing type 2 diabetes, some people can find it tough to manage their blood glucose levels even with medication,” he added.

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